How Boston’s new marijuana regulations affect lobster, crab, oysters, and more

Boston officials are trying to legalize marijuana, a growing market that is expected to grow even bigger.

The Boston Department of Public Health says it will be issuing a first-of-its-kind permit to grow and sell recreational marijuana by the end of the year.

It’s expected to create about 6,500 jobs and generate $1.6 billion in revenue for the city.

It would also allow recreational marijuana sales at restaurants, grocery stores, and marijuana dispensaries.

But some local lobstermen and seafood experts worry it could hurt the economy.

Mason, the owner of the Cape Cod-based lobster company, told CBS News he thinks the regulations could hurt lobster production.

“The only way we can get to our ultimate goal is to make the lobster a more attractive product for tourists and other people who want to visit, Mason said.”

If it makes the lobster more expensive to eat, then it doesn’t have any effect on lobster consumption.

“It’s a concern for the Massachusetts lobster industry that the new law would open up recreational marijuana to lobstermen with no medical or recreational use.

And it could affect some lobstermen who are already struggling with unemployment and low wages.”

The state’s lobsterman unions, along with the Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association, have voiced concerns that the legalization could drive lobstermen into the illegal marijuana market.”

They’re going to be the breadwinners and support our business.”

The state’s lobsterman unions, along with the Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association, have voiced concerns that the legalization could drive lobstermen into the illegal marijuana market.

Dolan said the industry would likely have to diversify its product and business model to stay competitive.

“I’m not sure if there will be an increase in sales,” Dolan said.

“I think they’re going be looking at what they can do to try to keep up with the demand for the product.”

But Dolan also said the new regulations would be good for the economy, especially since the lobstermen have a long way to go before recreational marijuana is legal in Massachusetts.

“When it’s legal, it’s going to bring jobs to our state,” he said.