‘The only thing I know about cannabis is that it’s a drug’: Marijuana advocate’s plea to Ohio governor

It’s a Friday afternoon in April in Columbus.

A dozen or so people are gathered around a large table, chatting and discussing marijuana legalization and cannabis policy, and a woman approaches to give the group a tour.

She tells the group that she’s a pot advocate, and she’s been in contact with Ohio Governor John Kasich, the state’s first marijuana legalization activist.

As they walk through the back door, a woman stops to ask a question.

“I want to know what your thoughts are on cannabis?” she asks.

The woman pauses, looks around the room and says, “I’m going to vote for Kasich.”

The woman, who is a registered Democrat, says that she is not interested in being part of the Kasich campaign.

“It’s not my life,” she says, before continuing to explain that she was recently diagnosed with breast cancer.

“The only time I’ve been able to be around my kids is on weekends.

I’ve never been able see them or hear them or talk to them.

I don’t have time for it.”

As the woman explains her story, she pauses and adds, “The way I feel about cannabis, it’s very personal.

It’s not something I feel comfortable sharing with my family.”

She pauses again.

“You have to understand, I have cancer, and it’s really hard on my family,” she continues.

It doesn’t feel right.” “

There are people in this room who are dying for the right to vote and be able do something about that.

It doesn’t feel right.”

The person pauses again, then continues, “We need a change.

I’m a lifelong Republican.

I never voted for a Democrat.

And I’m voting for John Kasich.”

A woman walks by to say hello to the woman, and the woman says, in response, “Hi.

I support you.”

The room erupts in applause.

The man in the front seat nods in approval.

“This is an opportunity to educate people about the realities of cannabis,” she tells the man.

“If you’re going to go out and vote for a Republican, you need to know that.”

This woman is a member of the Marijuana Policy Project, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the legalization of marijuana across the United States.

Her name is Sarah, and her story is not unlike that of thousands of other Ohioans who are now voting on November 8.

As the Ohio Marijuana Policy Coalition’s executive director, Sarah was diagnosed with cancer in May of this year.

She was told by doctors that she would not be able work, that she could not get any medical treatment, and that she wouldn’t be able afford chemotherapy.

“Cancer is a very difficult disease to treat,” Sarah told The Irish Star.

“When you’re diagnosed, it just goes from there.

The doctors told me, you’re not going to be alive in two years.

So I was told, you have to give it a chance.

And that’s what I did.

I waited to get cancer treatment, then I went to my primary care doctor, and he told me that he was going to do everything he could to treat me for as long as possible, but there was no hope.

So it’s been around for so long, I’ve had a lot of time to learn about cannabis. “

My cancer was diagnosed early in my life.

So it’s been around for so long, I’ve had a lot of time to learn about cannabis.

I know how to smoke it, I know what the effects are, and I know the positives and negatives of cannabis.

We have the resources, we have the support, we are in a place where we can take a stand and help people get the justice they deserve,” Sarah says. “

We are the only group of Americans who have made it legal in our state.

We have the resources, we have the support, we are in a place where we can take a stand and help people get the justice they deserve,” Sarah says.

“And I know I am.”

A day earlier, Sarah and her fellow supporters had gathered at the Ohio Capitol to hear Ohio Governor Kasich speak on marijuana legalization.

The Governor had a difficult time talking about the legalization of cannabis, even though he has spent a lot to help Ohioans get a handle on it.

At the end of the Governor’s speech, he announced that he would be releasing a “states’ rights” policy that would give the Attorney General the authority to prosecute states that do not legalize.

“In my opinion, this is the right approach,” Governor Kasich said.

“To protect our states and our citizens, we must ensure that our marijuana laws are enforced.”

But just a few days before that announcement, a federal judge had issued an injunction blocking the release of a proposed amendment to the Controlled Substances Act that would have allowed the states to craft their